Learning About the Land From Papua New Guinea's Soabesi Clan

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Learning About the Land From Papua New Guinea's Soabesi Clan

For three days, explorer Arita Baaijens and her guide hiked through dense, muddy and mountainous tropical rainforest

until they reached Seane Falls, a hamlet of about 90 inhabitants who make up the Soabesi clan.

Baaijens, who won the WINGS Humanity Award in 2014, lived with the Soabesi for two-and-a-half months, from November to February, as part of her Living Landscapes series, in which she seeks out wisdom from cultures who live close to nature.

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WINGS as an Agent of Connectivity

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WINGS as an Agent of Connectivity

WINGS Fellows are more than just scientists.

They are entrepreneurs, innovators, and leaders in their respective fields – which is why WINGS’ Managing Director Yael Jekogian recently spoke at the Women in Innovation and Connectivity conference as part of the United Nations Economic and Social Council’s Science, Technology and Innovation Forum.

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Training for the North Pole in the Arabian Desert

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Training for the North Pole in the Arabian Desert

The frozen tundra of the Arctic and the scorching desert of the Arabian Peninsula

surprisingly have a lot in common, if you ask British explorer Felicity Aston.

Aston, a WINGS Fellow who is best known as the first woman to ski across Antarctica alone, conceived, designed and The Women’s Euro-Arabian North Pole Expedition, with the aim to foster cultural understanding among women from Europe and the Middle East.

The team of 11 women handpicked by Aston is training to ultimately ski to the last degree of the North Pole.

“The goal is to complete a really great physical journey to send out a positive message about what women are achieving and to inspire others to do whatever their heart tells them to do,” Aston said.

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Antarctica as a Backdrop for Women in Science

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Antarctica as a Backdrop for Women in Science

The inaugural voyage of the Homeward Bound initiative,

comprising 76 women with critical science backgrounds, returned safely from a 21-day trip to Antarctica.

The goal of Homeward Bound is to elevate the voices of women in science and to encourage them to play a large role in influencing scientific policy. The organizers hope to reach 1,000 women over 10 years.

One of the goals of Homeward Bound is to discuss sustainability and global issues related to climate change, making Antarctica a fitting backdrop because of its importance in the study of global warming. 

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A Day Without Women of Discovery

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A Day Without Women of Discovery

International Women’s Day acknowledges the achievements of women around the world.

This year, women are uniting and holding a strike to call attention to the significant contributions women make in society. In solidarity, we are recognizing five WINGS fellows whose incredible discoveries significantly advanced their respective fields of science.

Without these trailblazers, our understanding of the world and the universe surely would be hindered. They are truly Women of Discovery. To learn more about the rest of our Fellows and the incredible work they do, visit our Fellows page.

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Antarctica as a Model for Other Worlds

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Antarctica as a Model for Other Worlds

WINGS Fellow Rosaly Lopes returned safely from her expedition to study Mount Erebus,

home to one of the planet’s only lava lakes – a unique geological phenomenon found more commonly on Jupiter’s moon Io than Earth.  Lopes has studied Io extensively with her work at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory.  Lopes spent one month on Mount Erebus, which is located on Antarctica, and is the southernmost active volcano on Earth.

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