While women comprise 48 percent of the total U.S. workforce, they comprise just 24 percent of the science, technology, engineering, and math – or STEM – fields, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

Women in science have made great strides over the last several decades, but the numbers are clear ... We have a long way to go.

In late 2015, the United Nations declared February 11 International Day of Women and Girls in Science to recognize the contributions of women to the scientific fields and to help empower women and girls to continue to transform the world. The need for science-based evidence in policymaking is increasingly crucial, and we know that women are part of the solution.

Here are five ways you can celebrate women and girls in science today:

 

1. Learn about a woman in science.

Though they have not always been recognized, throughout history women have made contributions to the fields of science and exploration. Take a moment to learn about women scientists throughout history and the 79 women who have received the WINGS' Women of Discovery Award since 2003.  

2. Sign the 500 Women Pledge.

Last year, a group of five women scientists drafted an open letter to reaffirm their commitment to inclusivity in society and scientific enterprise. More than 16,000 women from around the world have now added their names to the letter. If you are a woman in science, sign the pledge here.

3. March for Science.

On Earth Day, April 22, scientists and science enthusiasts alike will march in solidarity to support publicly-funded science as a pillar of human freedom and prosperity.

Click here to march with WINGS.

Click here to find a march in your area.

4. Register your action.

If you take action, submit it to the official womeninscienceday.org website, where you will be added to the collective voice on Parity in Science.

5. Support WINGS.

WINGS WorldQuest showcases the under-recognized discoveries and accomplishments of women explorers, promotes women working in the field sciences, and inspires the next generation of pathfinders. Since its founding in 2003, WINGS has provided more than $600,000 in unrestricted funding to women in science and exploration. You can make a tax-deductible donation to WINGS here.

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